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Assume the following table. I want to partition it in a way that it never happens to have elements from Field1 and Field2 which are "connected" (i.e. a and 1, a and 2, b and 1) go to a separate partition.

This is the solution with 3 partitions.

ab12, c3, d45

Is this kind or problems related to data science? On which section could I place it?

+--------+--------+
| Field1 | Field2 |
+--------+--------+
| a      | 1      |
+--------+--------+
| a      | 2      |
+--------+--------+
| b      | 1      |
+--------+--------+
| b      | 2      |
+--------+--------+
| c      | 3      |
+--------+--------+
| d      | 4      |
+--------+--------+
| d      | 5      |
+--------+--------+
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This would be more on-topic in either StackOverflow or the Database Administrators site.

This would be off-topic here as this is a db-related question and it has nothing to do with data science.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. Just to understand.. Data Mining, clustering is not a part of data science? $\endgroup$ – Revious Sep 6 '17 at 9:52
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    $\begingroup$ The problem is that this isn't Cluster Analysis, nor is it data mining. The question above is requesting for a deterministic algorithm which splits entries to multiple sets based on a specific criterion. Clustering in data science aims to establish clusters of data points without a clear outline among them, but with inherent similarities. $\endgroup$ – E_net9 is disappointed in SE Sep 6 '17 at 10:01
  • $\begingroup$ @E_net4: thanks $\endgroup$ – Revious Sep 7 '17 at 13:59

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